SPECIFICATIONS

 

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Overall Dimensions

 

Imperial

Metric

Series

Wing span

88ft 6in

93ft 6in

26.98m

28.50m

200/300/400

475/500

Wing chord at root

 

16ft 5in

16ft 9.5in

5.01m

5.11m

All versions except

475/500 (late prod)

Wing chord at tip

5ft 3.5in

5ft 5in

1.61m

1.65m

All versions except

475/500 (late prod)

Wing aspect ratio

8.0

8.5

8.65

 

200/300/400

500 (early prod)

475/500 (late prod)

Sweepback at quarter chord

20 degrees

 

All versions

Overall length

93ft 6in

107ft 0in

28.50m

32.61m

200/300/400/475

500

Fuselage length

83ft 10in

97ft 4in

25.55m

29.67m

200/300/400/475

500

Max fuselage width/depth

11ft 2in

3.40m

All versions

Overall height

24ft 6in

7.47m

All versions

Tailplane span

29ft 6in

8.99m

All versions

Ground clearance to fuselage

2ft 7.5in

0.80m

All versions

Wheel track

14ft 3in

4.34m

All versions

Wheel base

33ft 1in

33ft 0in

41ft 4in

10.08m

10.06m

12.60m

200/300/400

475

500

Overall turning radius measured to outer wing tip

51ft 6in

56ft 0in

15.70m

17.07m

200/300/400/475

500

 

Forward passenger door

Height

Width

Height to sill

 

5ft 8in

2ft 8in

7ft 0in

 

1.73m

0.82m

2.13m

 

All versions

All versions

All versions

Ventral entrance

Height

Width

Height to sill

 

6ft 0in

2ft 4in

7ft 0in

 

1.83m

0.71m

2.13m

 

All versions

All versions

All versions

Galley service door

Height

Width

Height to sill

 

4ft 0in

2ft 3in

7ft 0in

 

1.22m

0.69m

2.13m

 

All versions

All versions

All versions

Overwing emergency exits

Height

Width

 

3ft 0in

1ft 8in

 

0.91m

0.51m

 

All versions

All versions

Main deck freight door

Height

Width

Height to sill

 

6ft 1in

10ft 0in

7ft 0in

 

1.85m

3.05m

2.13m

 

400/475

400/475

400/475

Underfloor frt door (Fwd)

Height (projected)

Width

Height to sill

 

2ft 7in

3ft 0in

3ft 7in

 

0.79m

0.91m

1.09m

 

All versions

All versions

All versions

Underfloor frt door (Rear)

Height (projected)

Width

Height to sill

 

2ft 2in

3ft 0in

4ft 3in

 

0.66m

0.91m

1.30m

 

All versions

All versions

All versions

 

Internal Dimensions

 

Imperial

Metric

Series

Cabin length (including flight deck)

56ft 10in

70ft 4in

17.31m

21.44m

200/300/400/475

500

Max cabin width

10ft 4in

3.16m

All versions

Max cabin height

6ft 6in

1.98m

All versions

Max floor width

9ft 6in

2.98m

All versions

Floor area (approx)

 

506ft²

665ft²

47.00m²

61.78m²

200/300/400/475

500

Forward freight hold

Height

Width

Length

 

Volume

 

3ft 0in

7ft 5in

17ft 11in

22ft 10in

354ft³

451ft³

 

0.91m

2.26m

2.46m

6.96m

10.02m³

12.77m³

 

All versions

All versions

200/300/400/475

500

200/300/400/475

500

Rear freight hold

Height

Width

Length

 

 

Volume

 

3ft 0in

7ft 5in

11ft 6in

10ft 0in

15ft 0in

180ft³

156ft³

236ft³

 

0.91m

2.26m

3.51m

3.06m

4.59m

5.09m³

4.42m³

6.68m³

 

All versions

All versions

200/300/400

475

500

200/300/400

475

500

 

External Areas

 

Imperial

Metric

Series

Gross wing area

 

980ft²

1031ft²

91.04m²

95.78m²

200/300/400

475/500

Ailerons (total)

30.8ft²

2.86m²

All versions

Flaps (total)

175.6ft²

16.30m²

All versions

Spoilers (total)

24.8ft²

2.30m²

300/400/475/500

Vertical tail surface (total)

117.4ft²

10.90m²

All versions

Rudder (including tab)

32.8ft²

3.05m²

All versions

Horizontal tail surface (total)

257ft²

23.9m²

All versions

Elevators (including tab)

70.4ft²

6.55m²

All versions

 

Weights & Loadings

 

Imperial

Metric

Series

Typical Operating Weight Empty (varies with customer fit)

46,405lb

48,722lb

50,822lb

51,822lb

51,731lb

54,582lb

21,049kg

22,098kg

23,050kg

23,505kg

23,464kg

24,758kg

200

300

400

NAL 400

475

500

Maximum Payload

17,595lb

20,025lb

21,269lb

26,418lb

7,981kg

9,083kg

9,647kg

11,983kg

200

300/400

475

500

Maximum Take-off Weight

79,000lb

88,500lb

98,500lb

104,500lb

35,833kg

40,142kg

44,678kg

47,400kg

200

300/400

475

500

Maximum Landing Weight

 

71,000lb

78,000lb

87,000lb

32,204kg

35,380kg

39,462kg

200

300/400

475/500

Maximum Zero Fuel Weight (varies between customers – typical figure shown)

64,000lb

71,000lb

68,500lb

73,000lb

81,000lb

29,030kg

32,204kg

31,070kg

33,112kg

36,741kg

200

300/400

NAL 400

475

500

Maximum Wing Loading

78.3lb/ft²

88.8lb/ft²

89.2lb/ft²

96.7lb/ft²

382.0kg/m²

433.6kg/m²

435.5kg/m²

472.0kg/m²

200

300/400

475

500

Maximum Power Loading

3.82lb/lb st

3.96lb/lb st

4.16lb/lb st

390.1kg/kN

400.3kg/kN

424.7kg/kN

300/400

475

500

The Maximum Ramp Weight figure for each model is 500lb (226.8kg) greater than the quoted MTOW figure shown above.

 

Performance

 

 

Series

Max level cruising speed at 21,000ft (6,400) TAS

548mph (475kt, 882km/h)

541mph (470kt, 871km/h)

200/300/400

475/500

Fuel economical cruising speed at 25,000ft (7,620m) TAS

507mph (440kt, 815km/h)

461mph (400kt, 742km/h)

200/300/400

475/500

Max never exceed diving speed (structural) EAS at sea level

460mph (399kt, 740km/h)

472mph (410kt, 760km/h)

200

300/400/475/500

Stalling speed (take-off flap setting) EAS

125mph (109kt, 201km/h)

131mph (114kt, 211km/h)

114mph (99kt, 184km/h)

121mph (105kt, 195km/h)

200

300/400

475

500

Rate of climb at sea level at 345mph (300kt, 555km/h) EAS

2,500ft/min (762m/min)

2,580ft/min (786m/min)

2,480ft/min (756m/min)

2,280ft/min (695m/min)

200

300/400

475

500

Maximum cruise altitude

35,000ft (10,670m)

37,000ft (11,285m)

40,000ft (12,200m)

200

300/400/475/500

NAL 400

Still air range with max Fuel, ISA, with reserves for 230 miles (200nm, 370km) diversion and 45 minutes hold

2,130 miles (3,430km)

2,250 miles (3,620km)

2,300 miles (3,700km)

2,165 miles (3,484km)

200*

300/400

475

500

Still air range with capacity payload, ISA, reserves as above

875 miles (1,140km)

1,430 miles (2,300km)

1,865 miles (3,000km)

1,705 miles (2,744km)

200

300/400

475

500

 

Ferry range with zero payload, ISA, reserves as above

2,617 miles (4,215km)

2,477 miles (3,988km)

2,430 miles (3,912km)

2,339 miles (3,766km)

2,206 miles (3,552km)

3,950 miles (6,357km)

200*

300

400

475

500

NAL 400

Still air range with max standard fuel, ten passengers and 45 minutes reserve

3,753 miles (6,040km)

NAL 400

Still air range with max optional fuel, eight passengers and 45 minutes reserve

3,950 miles (6,357km)

NAL 400

Take-off run at sea level, ISA

6,500ft (1,981m)

7,500ft (2,286m)

7,450ft (2,270m)

5,500ft (1,676m)

6,500ft (1,981m)

200

300

400

475

500

Balanced take-off to 35ft (10.70m) at sea level, ISA

6,850ft (2,088m)

8,000ft (2,438m)

7,800ft (2,377m)

5,900ft (1,798m)

7,300ft (2,225m)

200

300

400

475

500

Landing distance (BCAR) at sea level, ISA, at max landing weight

4,720ft (1,439m)

475

Flap operating speeds

Take-off setting

 

253mph,(220kt, 408km/h)

276mph,(240kt, 445km/h)

 

200

300/400/500

Approach setting

207mph,(180kt, 334km/h)

220mph,(191kt, 354km/h)

222mph,(193kt, 358km/h)

200

300/400/475

500

Landing setting

190mph,(165kt, 306km/h)

207mph,(180kt, 334km/h)

211mph,(183kt, 339km/h)

200

300/400

475/500

Landing gear operating speeds

Approach setting

 

253mph,(220kt, 408km/h)

265mph,(230kt, 427km/h)

 

200

All other

* With optional centre tank

Integral wing tanks on all versions had a capacity of 2,235 Imperial Gallons ( 10,160 litres).

A centre tank of 850 Imperial Gallons (3,864 litres) was standard on all versions except the Series 200 where it was an option.

Additional extra tankage could be accommodated as a further option in the rear of the forward hold amounting to 350 imperial gallons (1,591 litres) or 700 imperial gallons (3,182 litres).

The National Aircraft Leasing  modified VIP aircraft were offered with either 1,015 imperial gallons (4,618 litres) or 1,332 imperial gallons (6,056 litres) once again fitted in the rear of the forward hold.

 

One-Eleven Series 200

The initial production version was the Series 200, powered by 46.3 KN Rolls-Royce RB163 Spey 506-14 turbofans. The aircraft (G-ASHG cn 004) first flew from Hurn on the 20 August 1963. First delivery went to Braniff Airways (N1543 cn 017) on 11 March 1965, while British United Airways received their first aircraft (G-ASJJ cn 014) on 6 April 1965. Other customers for this version were Braniff Airways, Mohawk Airlines, Aer Lingus, and Aloha Airlines. Three aircraft were also supplied new as corporate jets to Helmut Horten GmbH and Tenneco Inc, while two others were delivered to the Royal Australian Air Force. The last aircraft (N503T cn 183) was delivered to Tenneco on the 8 July 1969. A total of 58 Series 200 aircraft were built.

One-Eleven Series 300

In May 1963 BAC announced two new versions of the One-Eleven; the Series 300 and Series 400, both of which offered more powerful Spey 511-14s of 50.7 kN thrust, fitted into lengthened nacelles. Although dimensions were the same as the Series 200, the Series 300 offered longer range by virtue of an additional centre section fuel tank and a higher maximum take-off weight. The aircraft (G-ATPJ cn 033) first flew from Weybridge on the 20 May 1966. First delivery went to British Eagle International Airways (G-ATPJ cn 033) on 8 June 1966 while Laker Airways received their first aircraft on the 25 February 1967. The Series 300 was only ordered by three customers, British Eagle, Laker and Kuwait Airways who cancelled their order. The last aircraft was delivered to Laker (G-AVYZ cn 133) on the 11 April 1968. A total of 9 Series 300 aircraft were built.

One-Eleven Series 400

The Series 400 was originally configured with a maximum take-off weight of 36060 kgs, which was lower than the Series 300’s 40000 kgs due to US restrictions on the gross weight for two-crew operation. With the easing of the restrictions, the maximum take-off weights of US-operated Series 400s were brought into line with those of the Series 300 through adoption of 300’s additional centre-section fuel tank and the two models became effectively indistinguishable. The aircraft (G-ASYD cn 053) first flew from Hurn on the 13 July 1965. First delivery went to American Airlines (N5015 cn 055) on 23 December 1965. Other Series 400 customers included Austral, Autair, Bahamas Airways, Bavaria Flug, Channel Airways, Lacsa, Philippine Airlines, Quebecair, Tarom and VASP. One aircraft was supplied new as a corporate jet to Engelhard Industries, and two were delivered as transports to the Brazilian Air Force. The last Series 400 was delivered to Bavaria Flug (D-ANNO cn 160) on the 22 December 1970. A total of 70 Series 400 aircraft were built. Many former airline aircraft were subsequently converted to executive configuration and in particular 16 former American Airlines aircraft were converted by the Dee Howard Company at San Antonio for National Aircraft Leasing Inc. it is these aircraft that make up the great majority of the still active Series 400 fleet.

One-Eleven Series 475

The Series 475 was the last UK-built version of the One-Eleven, conceived to bring improved field performance to the One-Eleven range, in addition to the capability to operate from unprepared runways. These goals were achieved by combining the standard length fuselage of the Series 400 with the increased wingspan and more powerful engines of the Series 500 and a new undercarriage fitted with larger low pressure tyres. The Series 475’s maximum take-off weight was 44678 kg. The Aircraft (G-ASYD cn 053) first flew from Hurn on the 27 August 1970. The first delivery went to Faucett of Peru (OB-R-953 cn 239) on 23 July 1971. Further airline orders for the Series 475 came from Air Malawi, Air Pacific and Tarom. Three were fitted out as corporate jets and three more were supplied to the Air Force of the Sultanate of Oman, all of which were eventually fitted with a large cargo door (3.05m x 1.85m) on the port forward fuselage. The last two Series 475 (G-BLHD cn 260 and G-BLDH cn 262) were delivered to McAlpine Aviation on the 9 July 1984 A total of 13 Series 475 aircraft were built.

One-Eleven Series 500

The Series 500 was launched on the strength of an order placed on the 27th January 1967 by British European Airways. This version had the fuselage extended by 13ft 6in (4.11m) by the insertion of two plugs. This allowed for four more seat rows to be installed and therefore increased passenger capacity by twenty. Overwing emergency exits had to be doubled to four. Underfloor hold volume was increased. Various structural changes were also required and higher rated Speys were fitted. This gave the aircraft a maximum take-off weight of 47400 kg. The aircraft (G-ASYD cn 053) first flew from Hurn on the 30 June 1967. First delivery (G-AVMJ cn 138) went to British European Airways on the 29 August 1968. Other Series 500 customers included British United Airways, Caledonian Airways, Panair / Paninternational, Aviateca, Bahamas Airways, Court Line, Sadia / Transbrasil, ALA / Austral, British Midland Airways, Germanair, Tarom, Philippine Airlines, Bavaria, Phoenix Airways, Lacsa, Cyprus Airways and Britsh Airways. The last delivery went to Tarom (YR-BCO cn 272) on the 12 Mar 1982 and was the last ever airliner to be constructed at Hurn! A total of 87 Series 500 aircraft were built.

Rombac One-Eleven Series 560

An agreement for the licenced production of the One-Eleven at the Romanian Government aircraft (IRMA) factory in Baneasa, Romania on was signed 9 June 1979. As the first step towards the transfer of One-Eleven production, BAC produced two Series 525 passenger aircraft and a single windowless freighter Series 485 which were supplied to CNIAR as training models. A further 22 One-Elevens were then to be supplied in kit form from the UK and assembled locally with gradually increasing Romanian content. The first Rombac One-Eleven, (YR-BRA cn 401) a series 561RC was rolled out at Baneasa on 27 August 1982, and flew for the first time on 18 September 1982. Plans for the production of 80 One-Elevens in the country were however curtailed by political and social unrest and in the end only 9 Series 561s were produced between September 1982 and April 1989. The first aircraft was delivered to Tarom on 29 December 1982. The Romanian carrier took delivery of all but two of the aircraft produced, with the remaining two going to Romavia, the last of which (YR-BRI cn 409) was delivered on 1 January 1993. Two further aircraft were partially completed when production was abandoned and scrapped.

One-Eleven Series 670

A plan to supply a Series 475 derivative, the Series 670, as a YS-11 replacement to Japanese carriers resulted in one aircraft (G-ASYD cn 053) being developed and flown from Hurn on the 13 September 1977 as such, but hopes of a significant sales break through were ultimately frustrated, despite major improvements in performance, due to the Japanese authorities introducing more stringent regulatory requirements.

 

Projected developments not proceeded with

 

One-Eleven Series 600

This was a proposal to further develop the Series 500 with an additional fuselage extension, additional wing area and increased power with first deliveries to customers in the summer of 1972.  Initial details were announced in September 1968. The engines proposed were a development of the Spey Mk.512-14DW with an aft fan installed immediately behind the engine thrust reverse unit. To accommodate this fan entailed the re-alignment of the power unit in relation to the fuselage and some re-design of the nacelle and the fuselage/nacelle stub fairing. The fan would have been free running with a by-pass ratio of 3 : 1 resulting in an overall by-pass ratio of 5.7 : 1. The new engines would have had a sea level static thrust output of 19,370 lbs. The water injection system would have been retained. The fuselage was extended by inserting two plugs of 13ft 4in forward of the wing and 2ft 2in aft of the wing. The rear over-wing emergency exits were deleted while the forward over-wing exit was moved forward 1ft 11.5in. Further Type one emergency exits were added between the wing and the engines with the starboard door acting as a service door as well. The aft bulkhead of the main undercarriage bay was moved rearwards to accommodate wheels and tyres of increased size while an additional cargo door was fitted forward of the wing. The wing area was increased by 174 sq ft to 1,205 sq ft by deleting the 500 Series wing tip extension and by moving the 500 Series wing 5ft outboard on an extended centre section torque-box increasing the overall wing span by 5ft. A new flap section was added to the extended centre section. The tailplane area was increased by 58 sq ft to 316 sq ft while the fin area was increased by 30 sq ft which was achieved by the addition 2ft to its height and 1 ft to the chord at the leading edge. The tail bullet was deleted leaving the whole unit looking somewhat similar to that of the DC-9. The main landing gear was modified to give a longer stroke to the oleo units and to fit 44 x 13 – 20 wheels and tyres with larger wheel brakes. Where possible, 500 Series systems were retained with modifications for the increased sizes and volumes as required. The forward passenger entry door and airstairs together with the rear ventral airstairs were retained. A third toilet was added immediately aft of the forward entry door. Various cabin layouts were proposed. These were high capacity layout of 136 seats at 29/32in pitch, 119 single class seats at 34in pitch and a two class 14 first class seats at 38in pitch and 91 tourist class seats at 34in pitch.

In January 1978 a new version of the Series 600 (with customer number 601) was promoted and offered to British Airways.  This version was a much less modified version of the Series 500 than earlier proposed.  It retained the standard fuselage, fin and tailplane dimensions of the Series 500.  The wing was also largely unchanged and incorporated the new leading edge of the late production Series 500s and also utilised the leading edge cuff developed for the Series 670.  Revised flap settings were also incorporated.  With these changes an improvement of 7% would have been achieved in the take-off lift coefficient over the earlier Series.510ED giving improved airfield performance.  Automatic deployment of the lift dumpers on touch down was proposed together with an improved Hytrol 111A anti-skid system in an effort to reduce the pilot workload.  In the event of a go-around, the selection of increased power would lead to automatic retraction of the lift dumpers.  However, the main changes came with the engine both in efficiency and noise reduction.  The original Rolls-Royce Spey Mk.514-14 would have been retained but with re-engineered high temperature components for improved reliability and longer life using RB211 advanced technology.  Improved HP1 turbine blades with revised attachment and shroud, increased chord nozzle guide vanes in a relocated position for better cooling and redesigned flame tubes for greater combustion efficiency would have led to improvements in climb performance and single engine ceiling.  The silencing system would have had an acoustically-lined jet pipe with an eight lobe nozzle and an ejector cowl.  The ejector cowl was designed to move for and aft.  In the noise reduction mode at take-off and landing the cowl would have been moved aft to the point of maximum noise attenuation which would expose the thrust reverser cascades. At other times the cowl would have been moved forward to reduce drag and improve efficiency.  It was anticipated that a 60% reduction in noise nuisance would have come from these changes.  The use of water injection would no longer be employed with these changes.  An optional 350 imperial gallon fuel tank located in the rear of the forward under floor hold was also proposed.  This would have given the aircraft a 200 nautical miles increase in range with a maximum payload.  The new tank would have been isolated from the hold by a new bulkhead and would have reduced the forward hold capacity to 313 cubic feet.  By utilising light weight materials developed for Concorde a weight saving of 795 pounds was achieved in the cabin.  Newly sculptured roof panels, deeply sculptured sidewall panels and fully enclosed overhead bins were also proposed.  All these changes would have led to an increase in take-off and landing weights and in maximum payload range by almost 500 nautical miles over the Series 510EDs while compatibility with the earlier version already on strength would further increase efficiency.     

One-Eleven Series 700

This was a further development of the Series 500 and was announced in November 1973 and would have entered service in early 1977. The engine employed in this version would have been the Rolls-Royce RB163-67B, later named Spey Mk.606 with a sea level static thrust of 16,900 lbs. This was a development of the Spey 512 and was mounted in a similar way to that of the original Spey engine. This engine replaced the five-stage L.P. compressor with a single stage fan and a three stage I.P. compressor on the same shaft. In order to drive the new L.P. system a third L.P. turbine stage was added utilising knowledge gained from RB-211 technology. The existing 12 stage Mk.512 H.P. system was retained but with advanced turbine cooling technology.  No water injection system was employed. The engine was expected to have noise levels 5 EPNdB below FAR Part 36 requirements and 7 EPNdB below ICAO Annex 16levels when operated at aircraft maximum take-off weights and to have vastly improved fuel consumption rates over its previous form. This aircraft had an extended fuselage but less than in the Series 600. The forward plug in this case was 8ft 4in in length while the rear one was 3ft 8in.  Emergency exits were as for the Series 600 above. However, the ventral entrance was now made optional while in the standard form the rear entrance was via the new door between the wing and the engines. Once again, the original forward doors and the airstairs were retained. This version retained the standard Series 500 wing but strengthened to cope with the increased weights with minor changes to the flaps, flap carriages and tracks. The fin retained the tail bullet of the earlier Series 500 aircraft. New wheels, tyres (41 x 15 – 18) and brakes were to be fitted to a new landing gear with increased stroke over that of the Series 500. Changes to the air system were expected to be confined to an increase in the size of the heat exchangers and to the cold air units. All tourist seating capacity was set at 119 at 33/34in pitch, 129 at 30in pitch or 134 with only two galley units rather than four. Three cabin crew seats were to be fitted. In February 1978 the Weybridge Project Office announced what appeared to be a development of the Series 700 but powered by Rolls-Royce RB432 engines. Other changes over the Series 700 included the fin area being increased by 40sq ft and an extended rudder with increased area. This extended the overall length of the aircraft by 2ft 8in. Other changes from the Series 500 seem to be very similar to the Series 700 above. This version was not allocated a new Series number.

One-Eleven Series 800

The final version proposed an even further stretch and employing the CFM56 Turbofan of 22,000 lbs thrust and was announced in March 1975. The two fuselage plugs of this version entailed a forward one of 24ft 2in and a rear one of 8ft 4in. The cabin layouts proposed were 144 seats at 33/34in pitch or 161 at 30in pitch while four cabin crew seats were planned. Three galleys and three toilets were planned. Due to the increased passenger complement, eight emergency exits were planned comprising the two forward doors, two rear doors and reverting to the four overwing emergency exits of the Series 500. The tailplane and fin were extended while a new wing was fitted with increased area and span. A second forward cargo door was fitted in the new fuselage plug.    

 

Various projected versions compared with Series 500.

Series

500

600

700

800

*

Wing span

93ft 6in

98ft 6in

93ft 6in

103ft 6in

93ft 6in

Overall length

107ft 0in

124ft 2in

119ft 0in

142ft 0in

121ft 8in

Overall height

24ft 6in

27ft 0in

24ft 6in

25ft 9.5in

27ft 6in

Gross wing area

1,031sq ft

1,205sq ft

1,031sq ft

 

1,031sq ft

Wheel base

41ft 5in

54ft 8in

49ft 8in

 

49ft 8in

Wheel track

14ft 3in

15ft 7in

14ft 3in

 

14ft 3in

Fuselage length

97ft 4in

117ft 0in

110ft 2in

 

110ft 2in

Tailplane span

29ft 6in

40ft 2in

29ft 6in

 

29ft 6in

Hold volume

687cu ft

815cu ft

790cu ft

1,075cu ft

790cu ft

MTOW

104,500lb

122,500lb

117,000lb

140,000lb

115,000lb

MLW

87,000lb

112,500lb

100,000lb

124,000lb

100,000lb

Max seating

119

136

134

161

134

Engine thrust

12,550lb

19,730lb

16,900lb

22,000lb

17,550lb

Maximum payload range

1,480nm

1,220nm

1,300nm

1,825nm

1,000nm

Ferry range

1,915nm

1,900nm

2,240nm 

 

2,050nm

* Series 700 with Rolls-Royce RB432 engines.

 

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